Organise Climate Protest

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Organise Climate Protest
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Impact Local
Price free

Overview

Organize a climate march in your city

Goals

Get your voice heard out in the street

Timeline

1. Get a team together to help organize. 2. Choose a date, time, meeting location, and rough route. 3. If nothing you are doing is illegal, it's a good idea to notify the local police about your plans so that you don't run into any trouble with them. 4. Advertise & write a press release 5. Choose a few speakers for the beginning and end of the march. 6. Decide on some chants or songs for the crowd to say while you're marching, and choose a few people to help lead them. 7. Start making banners and signs for the march itself. 8. Show up a bit early for your crowd, and expect people to arrive late. Follow your plans. 9. Don't forget to thank the crowd afterwards!

Full description

1.Get a team together to help organize. Helpful if you know anyone who wants to help whose done this before, but definitely not necessary. 2. Choose a date, time, meeting location, and rough route. Take into consideration logistics for best turnout, and best to plan for a city center near a government building. It's common to end at a government building. 3. If nothing you are doing is illegal, it's a good idea to notify the local police about your plans so that you don't run into any trouble with them. You can look up the laws regarding this in your area. 4. Advertise- Make posters. Post them around town (near school campuses is a good idea) and post it on social media a couple weeks before the event. Get friends to share as well. Make them concise with all necessary information (purpose of the march, where and what time to meet, maybe what time the march itself will start, maybe where it will end, maybe link to an online place to find more information), and ideally make it aesthetically pleasing- you get it. Remind people again when its close. You should also try and create a press release. A draft is shown below. Try and keep it concise and engaging. Try and send this to every local media source you can find. Search on the internet for local radio stations and, newspapers. Email as many as possible, or even go to the local building and drop off a printed version. 5. Choose a few speakers for the beginning and end of the march. Talk about why you're all there, what it means to you, that sort of thing. 6. Decide on some chants or songs for the crowd to say while you're marching, and choose a few people to help lead them. If some are a bit more complicated, plan to train the crowd before you all start marching. There are plenty of good ones out there. A quick google search will find you more but here are some examples: "Hey hey! Ho ho! Fossil fuels have got to go!" "There is no planet B!" "Aint no power like the power of the people cuz the power of the people don't stop!" Call and response chants- "What do we want? Climate justice! When do we want it? Now!" (you can add "If we don't get it? Shut it down! If we don't get it? Shut it down!") "Whose streets? Our streets!" "Tell me what democracy looks like? This is what democracy looks like!" 7. Start making banners and signs for the march itself. Maybe plan a bit of a banner making party either a few evenings or a few hours before. You should encourage people to bring their own but also have plenty extra because there will most likely be attendees who don't have any but would like one. You can do this for cheap with recycled materials like old boxes or fabrics and basic markers or paints. 8. Show up a bit early for your crowd, and expect people to arrive late. Follow your plans. 9. Don't forget to thank the crowd afterwards!

Tips & Comments

Protesting in this manner can be made far more effective if you have clear goals. Work out exactly what change you want to see come out of this protest. The more specific, the easier it is to achieve a positive outcome. For example, you might want a local MP/ the local council to shift position for an upcoming vote. Write this down, and make sure every decision focuses on achieving this goal. In this example, it is important the local council finds out about your protest, and the numbers attending. Therefore, write to them, explaining your demands or inviting them to attend. It is likely they won't. Make sure the protest goes near their building, and maybe leave messages in chalk on the streets nearby. Afterwards, you should send them a letter, showing how many people attended, the opinions expressed, and again, reiterating your demands. Additonally, make social media posts, tagging the local council. If the response is unsatisfactory, try go to local media to explain the situation to increase pressure, or organise a follow up march.

Links

Press Release Draft